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Losing Weight: Yes We Can

1906 Weight-loss picture

Image by Nevada Tumbleweed via Flickr

Before the current child-obesity epidemic got started, Americans under 25 years old were, to a great degree, almost effortlessly fit. Mind you, we were more likely to down a six-pack than to sport one on our torsos. But that was a benefit of youth; we could consume what we wanted, eschew exercise, stay up late, and as long as we stayed out of trouble, chances were that we’d still be in decent shape.

Then we turned 30, and everything started to change. The difference was subtle at first, but it accelerated. Weight gain, rising blood pressure, weaker muscles, brittle bones, all were inevitable if we did nothing about it. I went from being thin to, as my mother kindly put it, “stocky.”

Losing weight is a daunting prospect for the typical deskbound adult. As we get older, even the healthiest among us have to go out of their way to eat right (but not too much) and exercise if they want to maintain a decent level of health and fitness. The trick, in my view, is to integrate the right behavior into one’s lifestyle, so it doesn’t seem like such a sacrifice.
Keep reading — Losing Weight: Yes We Can

Too Much Sodium

Sodium pictureExcess sodium in your body can kill you, even if you don’t have high blood pressure. The good news: most of us can reduce our sodium intake without having to eat overly bland food.

I was diagnosed with high blood pressure in the early 2000’s. Among other things, my doctor prescribed a blood pressure medication, and told me to cut my sodium intake. (Yes, and exercise too. I’m still working on that.) Excess sodium contributes to high blood pressure, and it can also increase the likelihood of some debilitating medical conditions. Although I significantly modified my diet, I still eat plenty of good food and I don’t feel deprived, but my blood pressure numbers are now well within the normal range.
Keep reading — Too Much Sodium

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